Patient Education

Mid Island Eye would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Mid Island Eye provides a full range of medical services including the following:


Eye Anatomy

The eye is a complex organ that works much like a camera, focusing light rays and forming an image. On the surface of the eye is the cornea, a thin, clear layer of tissue that provides a window for light to pass through. In a healthy eye, the cornea bends or refracts light rays so they focus precisely on the retina in the back of the eye. ...


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Cataract Surgery

Cataract surgery is a procedure performed to improve vision by replacing the lens of an eye clouded by a cataract. Cataracts affect millions of people in the United States each year. Most cataracts are the result of aging, though some form as a result of genetic factors or because of disease or injury. ...


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Astigmatism

Astigmatism is a refractive error of the eye. It occurs when light that enters the eye is not focused evenly onto the retina. Instead, the light is focused either in front of or behind the retina, resulting in vision that may be blurry for either near or far vision or, for all objects. ...


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Diabetic Laser Treatments

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common type of diabetic eye disease and the leading cause of blindness in the United States. This condition is caused by blood vessel changes within the retina that lead to swelling and leaking of fluid. It can also cause the growth of abnormal new blood vessels on the surface of the retina. The fluid can also leak into the center of the macula and cause swelling and blurred vision, a condition known as macular edema. The risk of developing macular edema increases as diabetic retinopathy progresses. ...


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Blepharitis

Blepharitis is the chronic inflammation, or infection, of the eyelids and the eyelash follicles along the edge of the eyelid. Blepharitis, which is not contagious, affects patients of all ages.

Causes of Blepharitis

There are several reasons for the occurrence of blepharitis, some of them are: ...


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Focal Macular Grid Treatment

People with diabetes are at risk of developing several kinds of diabetic eye diseases. One of these is macular edema, which is often asymptomatic until vision loss starts to occur. Leaking blood vessels within the retina will seep into the center of the macula, causing inflammation due to the accumulation of fluid. ...


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Cataracts

Cataracts affect millions of people each year, including more than half of all Americans age 60 and older. A cataract is the clouding of the eye's natural lens. Cloudiness develops as a result of a buildup of protein in the lens. Cataracts can occur in either one eye or both eyes. If left untreated, cataracts will worsen over time and may lead to permanent vision loss or even blindness. ...


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IOL Choices

A wide range of replacement lenses are available to cataract patients, each offering different advantages for post-surgery vision. The most effective lens to use depends on the patient's individual preferences and goals for their vision. The lenses eliminate the need for glasses or contacts after cataract surgery, providing most patients with convenient, effective results for their specific vision conditions. ...


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Chalazion

A chalazion is a small, non-infectious lump that develops in the upper or lower eyelid due to the blockage of the meibomian gland, an oil gland in the eyelid. The meibomian gland produces fluid that lubricates the eye. While children do develop chalazions, they more commonly affect adults between the ages of 30 to 50. ...


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LASIK

Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, also known as LASIK or laser vision correction, is a refractive procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism.

LASIK is the most common type of refractive surgery. Using targeted excimer laser beam energy, the LASIK procedure reshapes corneal tissue to correct refractive errors so that light rays are focused more precisely on the retina to produce clear, sharp vision. Patients who choose to undergo LASIK achieve clear vision without the need for glasses or contact lenses, while also benefiting from minimal downtime and little to no post-operative discomfort. ...


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Comprehensive Eye Examination

Regular eye exams are an important tool in eye health by detecting and preventing eye diseases and evaluating the overall health of the patient. Some diseases, such as glaucoma, develop gradually without symptoms of pain or vision loss, so patients may not notice that anything is wrong until significant and irreversible damage has been done. Early detection of eye diseases allows for a choice of treatment options and a reduced risk of permanent damage. ...


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Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK)

Photorefractive keratectomy, or PRK, is a laser vision correction procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct mild to moderate conditions of:

  • Nearsightedness, or myopia
  • Farsightedness, or hyperopia
  • Astigmatism

During the PRK procedure an excimer laser is used to remove a small amount of the front or anterior portion of the cornea to correct refractive errors . Unlike the LASIK procedure, where a flap is created to access the cornea, PRK removes the outer or epithelial layer of the cornea with the laser so that tissue can be removed from the surface. The process flattens the cornea and achieves the corneal steepening that is needed for vision correction. ...


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Diabetic Eye Disease

Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing eye conditions as a complication their disease. Over 40 percent of patients diagnosed with diabetes develop some form of eye disease as a result of their disease. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and the primary cause of blindness in the United States. ...


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Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty

Selective laser trabeculoplasty, or SLT, is an FDA-approved laser procedure for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma. SLT is an advanced treatment option that lowers eye pressure and increases fluid drainage. It is minimally-invasive and uses low levels of energy to selectively pinpoint the areas of the trabecular meshwork, relieving the symptoms of glaucoma. If needed, the procedure can be repeated several times without causing damage to surrounding tissue. ...


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Eye Infections

Eye infections can occur when a patient has been exposed to a virus, fungus or bacterium. Different types of infections strike particular portions of the eye. Both eyes or only one may become infected.

Symptoms of an Eye Infection

Common symptoms of an eye infection may include the following symptoms: ...


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YAG Posterior Capsulotomy

YAG posterior capsulotomy is a minimally invasive procedure performed to correct the most common complication of cataract surgery called posterior capsular opacification or PCO. When this complication occurs, the patient experiences a recurrence of the visual difficulties that precipitated the original cataract surgery. ...


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Contact Lenses

A contact lens is a thin disk which floats on the surface of the eye, providing vision correction.With advances in optical technology, almost everyone now can wear contact lenses, regardless of the type or extent of their vision problems. This includes patients with astigmatism and those who need bifocal or multifocal lenses. Most practices offer a comprehensive array of contact lenses to suit their patients' individual needs. All contact lenses require a prescription. ...


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Flashes and Floaters

Flashes and floaters of the eye commonly occur as the result of age-related changes to the vitreous gel. The vitreous is firmly attached to the retina at birth and is a thick, firm substance without much movement. As we age, the vitreous becomes thinner and more watery, and tissue debris that was once secure in the firm vitreous gel is now able to move around on the inside the eye and casts shadows on the retina. ...


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Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of related diseases that damage the optic nerve resulting in vision loss and blindness. Some of the diseases or conditions that contribute to the development of glaucoma include the following:

  • Increased pressure within the eye
  • Severe eye infection
  • Injury to the eye
  • Blocked blood vessels
  • Inflammatory conditions of the eye

Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness and visual impairment in the United States. Glaucoma can affect patients of all ages. Known as the "sneak thief of sight," many people affected with glaucoma do not experience any symptoms and may not be aware that they have the disease until they have lost a significant amount of vision. With early detection and treatment, eyes can be protected against the serious loss of vision or blindness. ...


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Prescription Eyeglasses

More than 140 million people in the United States wear eyeglasses. Eyeglasses improve vision by adjusting the way the eyes bend and focus light. Ideally, light rays are refracted, or bent, as they pass through the cornea so that they focus on the retina in the back of the eye. In a healthy eye, this means that objects can be seen clearly. Most people have corneas that have a shallow or steep curvature which causes light rays to focus in front of or behind the retina. Objects may then appear blurry at certain distances or at all distances. ...


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Bifocal and Multifocal Eyeglass Lenses

Presbyopia, which is the visual inability of the lens of the eye to focus on objects that are close, may take years to develop. Patients usually begin to show symptoms of presbyopia in their early- to mid-40s. Bifocal or multifocal eyeglasses will provide patients with presbyopia the ability to see clearly at all distances. ...


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Hyperopia

Hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, a condition of the eyes where the focus on distant objects is better than the focus on objects closer to the eye. As a result, nearby objects appear blurry. The eye is designed to focus images directly on the surface of the retina; with hyperopia, light rays focus behind the surface of the retina, producing a blurry image. ...


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BOTOX Cosmetic

BOTOX Cosmetic is a prescription drug that, when injected, temporarily paralyzes muscles. It contains a purified and safe form of botulinum toxin A, which is produced by the microbe that causes botulism. Manufactured by Allergan, Inc., it is used to treat permanent furrows and deep wrinkles in the skin that are formed by the continual contraction of facial muscles. In addition to its cosmetic applications, it is used to treat a number of medical problems, including excessive sweating, overactive bladder, neck spasms, crossed eyes, chronic back and jaw pain, and migraines. ...


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Macular Degeneration

Macular degeneration, also known as age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a common condition in older adults and the leading cause of vision loss in people over the age of 50. Macular degeneration affects the macula, the part of the retina responsible for the crisp, detailed central vision needed for reading or driving. As we age, the tissue in the eye responsible for vision slowly begins to deteriorate which can significantly affect a patient's quality of life. ...


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Myopia

Myopia, also known as nearsightedness or shortsightedness, is a condition of the eyes in which nearby objects are clear and distant objects appear blurry. Almost a third of people in the United States experience some degree of nearsightedness.

Causes of Myopia

Myopia may be caused by some of the following: ...


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Uveitis

Uveitis is the inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye, which contains the iris, ciliary body and the choroid. The uvea is located between the retina and sclera, the white of the eye. The uvea provides most of the blood to various parts of the eye with its numerous veins and arteries. ...


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Vitamins for Healthy Eyes

Eye vitamins can help maintain eye health and protect our eyes against several different diseases, including those that most frequently affect aging eyes, including macular degeneration.

Experts disagree on which nutrients can prevent eye disease or reduce vision loss. Studies have been conducted to help us learn more about the relationship between vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and eye health. The general consensus is that the same things that are good for your body are good for your eyes: a healthy diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains, drinking at least six glasses of water a day, regular exercise, and avoidance of cigarette smoke. ...


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